27 mars 2015 ~ 0 Commentaire

What Are The Primary Causes Of Adult Aquired FlatFoot ?

Overview

A more serious condition, according to ACFAS, is adult-acquired flatfoot, often cause by posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD). In this case, the tendon that supports the arch weakens and fails, leading to a rigid flatfoot where the arch stays flat even when you aren’t standing. It can lead to a loss of range of motion in the foot and ankle and pain in the arch. The ACFAS clinical guideline recommends that flatfoot caused by PTTD can be treated with custom shoe orthotics, soft casts, walking boots, physical therapy and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications. If there is no relief or the condition worsens, then the patient may be referred to surgery.Flat Foot


Causes

Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction is the most common cause of acquired adult flatfoot. Sometimes this can be a result of specific trauma, but usually the tendon becomes injured from wear and tear over time. This is more prevalent in individuals with an inherited flat foot but excessive weight, age, and level of activity are also contributing factors.


Symptoms

The symptoms of PTTD may include pain, swelling, a flattening of the arch, and inward rolling of the ankle. As the condition progresses, the symptoms will change. For example, later, as the arch begins to flatten, there may still be pain on the inside of the foot and ankle. But at this point, the foot and toes begin to turn outward and the ankle rolls inward. As PTTD becomes more advanced, the arch flattens even more and the pain often shifts to the outside of the foot, below the ankle. The tendon has deteriorated considerably and arthritis often develops in the foot. In more severe cases, arthritis may also develop in the ankle. Symptoms, which may occur in some persons with flexible flatfoot, include. Pain in the heel, arch, ankle, or along the outside of the foot. ?Turned-in? ankle. Pain associated with a shin splint. General weakness / fatigue in the foot or leg.


Diagnosis

Clinicians need to recognize the early stage of this syndrome which includes pain, swelling, tendonitis and disability. The musculoskeletal portion of the clinical exam can help determine the stage of the disease. It is important to palpate the posterior tibial tendon and test its muscle strength. This is tested by asking patient to plantarflex and invert the foot. Joint range of motion is should be assessed as well. Stiffness of the joints may indicate longstanding disease causing a rigid deformity. A weightbearing examination should be performed as well. A complete absence of the medial longitudinal arch is often seen. In later stages the head of the talus bone projects outward to the point of a large « lump » in the arch. Observing the patient’s feet from behind shows a significant valgus rotation of the heel. From behind, the « too many toes » sign may be seen as well. This is when there is abducution of the forefoot in the transverse plane allowing the toes to be seen from behind. Dysfunction of the posterior tibial tendon can be assessed by asking the patient to stand on his/her toes on the affected foot. If they are unable to, this indicates the disease is in a more advanced stage with the tendon possibly completely ruptured.


Non surgical Treatment

A painless flatfoot that does not hinder your ability to walk or wear shoes requires no special treatment or orthotic device. Other treatment options depend on the cause and progression of the flatfoot. Conservative treatment options include making shoe modifications. Using orthotic devices such as arch supports and custom-made orthoses. Taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen to relieve pain. Using a short-leg walking cast or wearing a brace. Injecting a corticosteroid into the joint to relieve pain. Rest and ice. Physical therapy. In some cases, surgery may be needed to correct the problem. Surgical procedures can help reduce pain and improve bone alignment.

Adult Acquired Flat Foot


Surgical Treatment

When conservative care fails to control symptoms and/or deformity, then surgery may be needed. The goal of surgical treatment is to obtain good alignment while keeping the foot and ankle as flexible as possible. The most common procedures used with this condition include arthrodesis (fusion), osteotomy (cutting out a wedge-shaped piece of bone), and lateral column lengthening. Lateral column lengthening involves the use of a bone graft at the calcaneocuboid joint. This procedure helps restore the medial longitudinal arch (arch along the inside of the foot). A torn tendon or spring ligament will be repaired or reconstructed. Other surgical options include tendon shortening or lengthening. Or the surgeon may move one or more tendons. This procedure is called a tendon transfer. Tendon transfer uses another tendon to help the posterior tibial tendon function more effectively. A tendon transfer is designed to change the force and angle of pull on the bones of the arch. It’s not clear yet from research evidence which surgical procedure works best for this condition. A combination of surgical treatments may be needed. It may depend on your age, type and severity of deformity and symptoms, and your desired level of daily activity.

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